A Melbourne-based IT company is launching a pilot program in a school in central Victoria to help young people land jobs in the technology industry.

Melbourne Technical School will use its network of IT apprenticeships to train people in a variety of fields, from coding to software engineering, according to its website.

“It’s important for young people to get the skills to build careers in the future,” MATLAB president and chief executive officer Andrew Stacey said.

“We’re looking for those who are motivated, skilled, capable and ready to take on the challenge.”

The Melbourne Technical Education Fund (METAF) has about 20 apprenticeships available in the Melbourne region and is looking to expand the program to more schools.MATLAB is currently offering three pilot programs in the area.

“In our first three years we saw an increase in the number of people who were accepted into the apprenticeships, but it’s still very small compared to the numbers we’re looking at now,” Mr Stacey explained.

“So we’re going to expand this further and see how many people we can recruit.”

The METAF pilot program has been running in Melbourne for about a year, and aims to recruit up to 30 students a year.

“The people that have been accepted into our apprenticeships are not just skilled engineers, they’re also designers, web developers, social media managers, marketing professionals, data analysts and even some architects,” Mr Wahl said.

MATLAB has been using the money it receives from the program in the past to buy and refurbish its building.

The university is currently looking to find a permanent home for the building, and is currently considering other locations for the facility.

Mr Stacey is keen to keep the building open for as long as possible.

“If you want to be a successful entrepreneur in Australia, you need a home that’s secure, that’s well maintained, you can actually afford to keep,” he said.

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